dynamicafrica:

Taking Headwraps and Fabrics to a Whole New Level with AD Magazine Russia.
Photographer Olga Volkova Tuponogova-  Stylist: Natalia Obukhov  Model: Keshia Asiedu  Producer: Maria Kuznetsova  Makeup artist: Polina Karpov / MaestroArtExtraordinary  Assistant Photographer: Konstantin Egon  Assistant Stylist: Katerina Konyushenko
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

Taking Headwraps and Fabrics to a Whole New Level with AD Magazine Russia.
Photographer Olga Volkova Tuponogova-  Stylist: Natalia Obukhov  Model: Keshia Asiedu  Producer: Maria Kuznetsova  Makeup artist: Polina Karpov / MaestroArtExtraordinary  Assistant Photographer: Konstantin Egon  Assistant Stylist: Katerina Konyushenko
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

Taking Headwraps and Fabrics to a Whole New Level with AD Magazine Russia.
Photographer Olga Volkova Tuponogova-  Stylist: Natalia Obukhov  Model: Keshia Asiedu  Producer: Maria Kuznetsova  Makeup artist: Polina Karpov / MaestroArtExtraordinary  Assistant Photographer: Konstantin Egon  Assistant Stylist: Katerina Konyushenko
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

Taking Headwraps and Fabrics to a Whole New Level with AD Magazine Russia.
Photographer Olga Volkova Tuponogova-  Stylist: Natalia Obukhov  Model: Keshia Asiedu  Producer: Maria Kuznetsova  Makeup artist: Polina Karpov / MaestroArtExtraordinary  Assistant Photographer: Konstantin Egon  Assistant Stylist: Katerina Konyushenko
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter
All Africa, All the time.

dynamicafrica:

Taking Headwraps and Fabrics to a Whole New Level with AD Magazine Russia.

Photographer Olga Volkova Tuponogova-
Stylist: Natalia Obukhov
Model: Keshia Asiedu
Producer: Maria Kuznetsova
Makeup artist: Polina Karpov / MaestroArtExtraordinary
Assistant Photographer: Konstantin Egon
Assistant Stylist: Katerina Konyushenko

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.

(via pierrebennu)

ventureandvirtue:

Deadpan (1997) dir. Steve McQueen
*McQueen references Buster Keaton*

Excellent ventureandvirtue:

Deadpan (1997) dir. Steve McQueen
*McQueen references Buster Keaton*

Excellent ventureandvirtue:

Deadpan (1997) dir. Steve McQueen
*McQueen references Buster Keaton*

Excellent ventureandvirtue:

Deadpan (1997) dir. Steve McQueen
*McQueen references Buster Keaton*

Excellent

ventureandvirtue:

Deadpan (1997) dir. Steve McQueen

*McQueen references Buster Keaton*

Excellent

(via eloronegro)

yagazieemezi:

A typical Igbo traditional wedding has two different ceremonies: 
The first one is called the ‘Iku Aka’ or ‘Knocking on the door’ where the groom and members of his family (uncles and brothers) come to tell the family of the bride of his intention to marry their daughter. The mother and father of the bride each get a keg of palmwine (ngwo) and one or more for the father’s Umunna (brothers, cousins, etc)
The second ceremony, referred to as the ‘Igba Nkwu Nwanyi/izu okwu’ (wine carrying ceremony) is the actual wedding. The groom is supposed to assist his in-laws-to-be with the planning of this ceremony so he can provide Assorted drinks, a cow, bags of rice and ingredients for cooking.
When they arrive, the groom and few family members join the father of the bride in private and discuss the ‘ima ego’ or dowry. Once this is done and accepted, the bride dances out for the first time. Accompanied by her friends  in her native attire of 2 separate pieces of George wrapper (one for her waist and the other for her bust) she goes to greet her mother’s people and goes back inside. Her second outfit is white blouse and George or damask or brocade which she uses to greet her father’s people and she goes back inside. The third outing is usually in material similar to the grooms, this time, she is handed a cup of wine and told to find her husband and give it to him to drink. When she finds him, she kneels to give him the horn and waits for him to finish. Sometimes, the groom might lift his bride up and give the rest of the wine. This usually indicates he understands she is his help mate and is accompanied by much cheering. The couple then kneel before the parents for prayers and blessings. Then the party really begins.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

A typical Igbo traditional wedding has two different ceremonies: 
The first one is called the ‘Iku Aka’ or ‘Knocking on the door’ where the groom and members of his family (uncles and brothers) come to tell the family of the bride of his intention to marry their daughter. The mother and father of the bride each get a keg of palmwine (ngwo) and one or more for the father’s Umunna (brothers, cousins, etc)
The second ceremony, referred to as the ‘Igba Nkwu Nwanyi/izu okwu’ (wine carrying ceremony) is the actual wedding. The groom is supposed to assist his in-laws-to-be with the planning of this ceremony so he can provide Assorted drinks, a cow, bags of rice and ingredients for cooking.
When they arrive, the groom and few family members join the father of the bride in private and discuss the ‘ima ego’ or dowry. Once this is done and accepted, the bride dances out for the first time. Accompanied by her friends  in her native attire of 2 separate pieces of George wrapper (one for her waist and the other for her bust) she goes to greet her mother’s people and goes back inside. Her second outfit is white blouse and George or damask or brocade which she uses to greet her father’s people and she goes back inside. The third outing is usually in material similar to the grooms, this time, she is handed a cup of wine and told to find her husband and give it to him to drink. When she finds him, she kneels to give him the horn and waits for him to finish. Sometimes, the groom might lift his bride up and give the rest of the wine. This usually indicates he understands she is his help mate and is accompanied by much cheering. The couple then kneel before the parents for prayers and blessings. Then the party really begins.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

A typical Igbo traditional wedding has two different ceremonies: 
The first one is called the ‘Iku Aka’ or ‘Knocking on the door’ where the groom and members of his family (uncles and brothers) come to tell the family of the bride of his intention to marry their daughter. The mother and father of the bride each get a keg of palmwine (ngwo) and one or more for the father’s Umunna (brothers, cousins, etc)
The second ceremony, referred to as the ‘Igba Nkwu Nwanyi/izu okwu’ (wine carrying ceremony) is the actual wedding. The groom is supposed to assist his in-laws-to-be with the planning of this ceremony so he can provide Assorted drinks, a cow, bags of rice and ingredients for cooking.
When they arrive, the groom and few family members join the father of the bride in private and discuss the ‘ima ego’ or dowry. Once this is done and accepted, the bride dances out for the first time. Accompanied by her friends  in her native attire of 2 separate pieces of George wrapper (one for her waist and the other for her bust) she goes to greet her mother’s people and goes back inside. Her second outfit is white blouse and George or damask or brocade which she uses to greet her father’s people and she goes back inside. The third outing is usually in material similar to the grooms, this time, she is handed a cup of wine and told to find her husband and give it to him to drink. When she finds him, she kneels to give him the horn and waits for him to finish. Sometimes, the groom might lift his bride up and give the rest of the wine. This usually indicates he understands she is his help mate and is accompanied by much cheering. The couple then kneel before the parents for prayers and blessings. Then the party really begins.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

A typical Igbo traditional wedding has two different ceremonies: 
The first one is called the ‘Iku Aka’ or ‘Knocking on the door’ where the groom and members of his family (uncles and brothers) come to tell the family of the bride of his intention to marry their daughter. The mother and father of the bride each get a keg of palmwine (ngwo) and one or more for the father’s Umunna (brothers, cousins, etc)
The second ceremony, referred to as the ‘Igba Nkwu Nwanyi/izu okwu’ (wine carrying ceremony) is the actual wedding. The groom is supposed to assist his in-laws-to-be with the planning of this ceremony so he can provide Assorted drinks, a cow, bags of rice and ingredients for cooking.
When they arrive, the groom and few family members join the father of the bride in private and discuss the ‘ima ego’ or dowry. Once this is done and accepted, the bride dances out for the first time. Accompanied by her friends  in her native attire of 2 separate pieces of George wrapper (one for her waist and the other for her bust) she goes to greet her mother’s people and goes back inside. Her second outfit is white blouse and George or damask or brocade which she uses to greet her father’s people and she goes back inside. The third outing is usually in material similar to the grooms, this time, she is handed a cup of wine and told to find her husband and give it to him to drink. When she finds him, she kneels to give him the horn and waits for him to finish. Sometimes, the groom might lift his bride up and give the rest of the wine. This usually indicates he understands she is his help mate and is accompanied by much cheering. The couple then kneel before the parents for prayers and blessings. Then the party really begins.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

A typical Igbo traditional wedding has two different ceremonies: 
The first one is called the ‘Iku Aka’ or ‘Knocking on the door’ where the groom and members of his family (uncles and brothers) come to tell the family of the bride of his intention to marry their daughter. The mother and father of the bride each get a keg of palmwine (ngwo) and one or more for the father’s Umunna (brothers, cousins, etc)
The second ceremony, referred to as the ‘Igba Nkwu Nwanyi/izu okwu’ (wine carrying ceremony) is the actual wedding. The groom is supposed to assist his in-laws-to-be with the planning of this ceremony so he can provide Assorted drinks, a cow, bags of rice and ingredients for cooking.
When they arrive, the groom and few family members join the father of the bride in private and discuss the ‘ima ego’ or dowry. Once this is done and accepted, the bride dances out for the first time. Accompanied by her friends  in her native attire of 2 separate pieces of George wrapper (one for her waist and the other for her bust) she goes to greet her mother’s people and goes back inside. Her second outfit is white blouse and George or damask or brocade which she uses to greet her father’s people and she goes back inside. The third outing is usually in material similar to the grooms, this time, she is handed a cup of wine and told to find her husband and give it to him to drink. When she finds him, she kneels to give him the horn and waits for him to finish. Sometimes, the groom might lift his bride up and give the rest of the wine. This usually indicates he understands she is his help mate and is accompanied by much cheering. The couple then kneel before the parents for prayers and blessings. Then the party really begins.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

A typical Igbo traditional wedding has two different ceremonies: 

The first one is called the ‘Iku Aka’ or ‘Knocking on the door’ where the groom and members of his family (uncles and brothers) come to tell the family of the bride of his intention to marry their daughter. The mother and father of the bride each get a keg of palmwine (ngwo) and one or more for the father’s Umunna (brothers, cousins, etc)

The second ceremony, referred to as the ‘Igba Nkwu Nwanyi/izu okwu’ (wine carrying ceremony) is the actual wedding. The groom is supposed to assist his in-laws-to-be with the planning of this ceremony so he can provide Assorted drinks, a cow, bags of rice and ingredients for cooking.

When they arrive, the groom and few family members join the father of the bride in private and discuss the ‘ima ego’ or dowry. Once this is done and accepted, the bride dances out for the first time. Accompanied by her friends  in her native attire of 2 separate pieces of George wrapper (one for her waist and the other for her bust) she goes to greet her mother’s people and goes back inside. Her second outfit is white blouse and George or damask or brocade which she uses to greet her father’s people and she goes back inside. The third outing is usually in material similar to the grooms, this time, she is handed a cup of wine and told to find her husband and give it to him to drink. When she finds him, she kneels to give him the horn and waits for him to finish. Sometimes, the groom might lift his bride up and give the rest of the wine. This usually indicates he understands she is his help mate and is accompanied by much cheering. The couple then kneel before the parents for prayers and blessings. Then the party really begins.

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

afrodiaspores:

Portraits from the series Caste, 2011. Holly Bynoe explains,

Leah Gordon’s new photographs investigate the practice of the grading from [B]lack to white of skin colour, referred to as Caste, which revealed the extent of racial mixing in 18th century colonial Haiti…
A measuring system which moves through black to white in nine degrees, it was developed by a French colonialist living in Haiti during the slave plantation period…There are nine degrees of shading in all, from pure [B]lack to 1/8 white, and 7/8 black and so on through ‘Sacatra’, ‘Griffe’, ‘Marabou’, ‘Mulâtre’, ‘Mamelouque’, ‘Quarteronné’ and ‘Sang-Mêlé’ to ‘White’.
The images reference celebrated Renaissance portraits, styled so that they closely resemble, but don’t completely mimic, works such as Bellini’s Doge Loredan (Noir), The Betrothal of the Arnolfini by Jan Van Eyck and Holbein’s Lady with a Squirrel (Blanche). Gordon found her models in the Grand Rue area of Port-au-Prince, home to the artists’ collective Atis Rezistans. She worked with local craftsmen to make the costumes for the sitters and wooden plaques behind which the models stand, bearing the identifying names of the caste colours. There is a double impact here, both in the unexpectedness of seeing a [B]lack face in these familiar portraits and in seeing the dignity with which the sitters bear their signifying labels.

afrodiaspores:

Portraits from the series Caste, 2011. Holly Bynoe explains,

Leah Gordon’s new photographs investigate the practice of the grading from [B]lack to white of skin colour, referred to as Caste, which revealed the extent of racial mixing in 18th century colonial Haiti…
A measuring system which moves through black to white in nine degrees, it was developed by a French colonialist living in Haiti during the slave plantation period…There are nine degrees of shading in all, from pure [B]lack to 1/8 white, and 7/8 black and so on through ‘Sacatra’, ‘Griffe’, ‘Marabou’, ‘Mulâtre’, ‘Mamelouque’, ‘Quarteronné’ and ‘Sang-Mêlé’ to ‘White’.
The images reference celebrated Renaissance portraits, styled so that they closely resemble, but don’t completely mimic, works such as Bellini’s Doge Loredan (Noir), The Betrothal of the Arnolfini by Jan Van Eyck and Holbein’s Lady with a Squirrel (Blanche). Gordon found her models in the Grand Rue area of Port-au-Prince, home to the artists’ collective Atis Rezistans. She worked with local craftsmen to make the costumes for the sitters and wooden plaques behind which the models stand, bearing the identifying names of the caste colours. There is a double impact here, both in the unexpectedness of seeing a [B]lack face in these familiar portraits and in seeing the dignity with which the sitters bear their signifying labels.

afrodiaspores:

Portraits from the series Caste, 2011. Holly Bynoe explains,

Leah Gordon’s new photographs investigate the practice of the grading from [B]lack to white of skin colour, referred to as Caste, which revealed the extent of racial mixing in 18th century colonial Haiti…
A measuring system which moves through black to white in nine degrees, it was developed by a French colonialist living in Haiti during the slave plantation period…There are nine degrees of shading in all, from pure [B]lack to 1/8 white, and 7/8 black and so on through ‘Sacatra’, ‘Griffe’, ‘Marabou’, ‘Mulâtre’, ‘Mamelouque’, ‘Quarteronné’ and ‘Sang-Mêlé’ to ‘White’.
The images reference celebrated Renaissance portraits, styled so that they closely resemble, but don’t completely mimic, works such as Bellini’s Doge Loredan (Noir), The Betrothal of the Arnolfini by Jan Van Eyck and Holbein’s Lady with a Squirrel (Blanche). Gordon found her models in the Grand Rue area of Port-au-Prince, home to the artists’ collective Atis Rezistans. She worked with local craftsmen to make the costumes for the sitters and wooden plaques behind which the models stand, bearing the identifying names of the caste colours. There is a double impact here, both in the unexpectedness of seeing a [B]lack face in these familiar portraits and in seeing the dignity with which the sitters bear their signifying labels.

afrodiaspores:

Portraits from the series Caste, 2011. Holly Bynoe explains,

Leah Gordon’s new photographs investigate the practice of the grading from [B]lack to white of skin colour, referred to as Caste, which revealed the extent of racial mixing in 18th century colonial Haiti…

A measuring system which moves through black to white in nine degrees, it was developed by a French colonialist living in Haiti during the slave plantation period…There are nine degrees of shading in all, from pure [B]lack to 1/8 white, and 7/8 black and so on through ‘Sacatra’, ‘Griffe’, ‘Marabou’, ‘Mulâtre’, ‘Mamelouque’, ‘Quarteronné’ and ‘Sang-Mêlé’ to ‘White’.

The images reference celebrated Renaissance portraits, styled so that they closely resemble, but don’t completely mimic, works such as Bellini’s Doge Loredan (Noir)The Betrothal of the Arnolfini by Jan Van Eyck and Holbein’s Lady with a Squirrel (Blanche). Gordon found her models in the Grand Rue area of Port-au-Prince, home to the artists’ collective Atis Rezistans. She worked with local craftsmen to make the costumes for the sitters and wooden plaques behind which the models stand, bearing the identifying names of the caste colours. There is a double impact here, both in the unexpectedness of seeing a [B]lack face in these familiar portraits and in seeing the dignity with which the sitters bear their signifying labels.

(via orderwithinchaos)

J.D.’Okhai Ojeikere - Untitled, Circa 1959

<3

(via spiritsrebellious)

africaninsights:

7sobm:
Botswana
africaninsights:

7sobm:
Botswana
africaninsights:

7sobm:
Botswana
africaninsights:

7sobm:
Botswana
africaninsights:

7sobm:
Botswana
africaninsights:

7sobm:
Botswana
africaninsights:

7sobm:
Botswana
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)
dynamicafrica:

Pascal Meunier: Oualata, a garden in the Sahara [Mauritania]
(via 5centsapound)

Nina Simone, Lena Horne and more black female performers who sang their civil rights

nerdettepodcast:

From Ella Baker to Abbey Lincoln, Lena Horne to Dorothy Height, let’s get to know women central to the civil rights movement. Some preferred staying behind-the-scenes, others performed their civil rights on stage and screen. Then we bring the conversation up to the present by talking about what’s changed since then (and what hasn’t) for performers like Beyoncé. Thanks for listening and sharing!

Nerdette Podcast is on: iTunes | Stitcher | SoundCloud

(via npr)